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Single-Store Operators Fuel 2023 C-Store Count Growth

Annual U.S. convenience-store tally increases, reversing 4-year decline
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There are 150,174 convenience stores operating in the United States, a 1.5% increase over 148,026 from a year earlier, reversing a four-year decline, according to the 2023 NACS/NielsenIQ Convenience Industry Store Count.

Convenience stores sell an estimated 80% of the motor fuels purchased by consumers in the United States. The new store count shows that 118,678 convenience stores sell motor fuels (79% of all convenience stores).

Store count increases were recorded in 39 states and Washington, D.C., led by Georgia, which added 271 stores. California lost 53 stores, the most of the seven states that saw their counts decline. The industry growth was fueled by a 1,087-count increase in single-store operators, which now stand at 90,423 stores (60.2% of all convenience stores).

In addition, there are “gas station/kiosk” stores that sell fuel but not enough of an in-store product assortment to be considered convenience stores. Overall, there are 13,346 kiosks. The kiosk format continued to decline—down 11.2% the past year and 49.3% over the past six years—as more consumers sought out stores that have robust food and beverage offers, said NACS.

While the overall convenience-store count indicated growth, results were mixed for similar channels:

U.S. Retail Channels
Channel20232022% Change
Convenience150,174148,0261.5
C-Store Selling Fuels118,678116,6411.7
Fuels Kiosks13,34614,826(10.0)
Grocery45,38045,687(0.7)
Drug40,00840,402(1.0)
Dollar37,06735,5014.4

With the U.S. population at 334.2 million, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, there is one c-store for every 2,225 people.

“The value of convenience continues to grow, and that’s a driving factor why every retailer, regardless of channel, seeks to provide it. And it’s also clear that the convenience offer at convenience stores resonates with consumers, given the record in-store sales at convenience stores and increase in store count,” said NACS Managing Director of Research Chris Rapanick.

U.S. Convenience-Store Counts

  • 2023 — 150,174 (+1.5%)
  • 2022 — 148,026 (-1.5%)
  • 2021 — 150,274 (-1.6%)
  • 2020 — 152,720 (-0.3%)
  • 2019 — 153,237 (-1.1%)
  • 2018 — 154,958 (+0.3%)
  • 2017 — 154,535 (+0.2%)
  • 2016 — 154,195 (+0.9%)
  • 2015 — 152,794 (+0.9%)
  • 2014 — 151,282 (+1.4%)
  • 2013 — 149,220 (+0.7%)
  • 2012 — 148,126 (+1.2%)

State Rankings

Texas continues to have the most convenience stores (16,018 stores), or more than 1 in 10. The remainder of the top 10 is the same order from the year prior: Despite a decline in store count, California remains second at 12,000 stores, followed by Florida (9,596), New York (7,917), Georgia (6,719), North Carolina (5,749), Ohio (5,673), Michigan (4,879), Pennsylvania (4,728) and Illinois (4,666). Alaska grew its store count by 9.2% but still has the fewest stores (190) of any state.

The 2023 NACS/NielsenIQ Convenience Industry Store Count is based on stores in operation as of December 2022.

Chicago-based NielsenIQ, a global information services company, delivers consumer and retail measurement services.

Founded in 1961 as the National Association of Convenience Stores, Alexandria, Va.-based NACS advances the role of convenience stores as positive economic, social and philanthropic contributors to the communities they serve and is an adviser to retailer and supplier members from more than 50 countries.

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